Life in Old South Central Alabama

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South of Birmingham, Alabama, United States
I am an antique trader in central Alabama....I love old houses... My log home was built in 1817 by my ancestors Benjamin and Hannah Harless Wilson .............. Outside the house are herb gardens and lots of pass-along plants................ No one in Alabama is in a hurry about anything......... Visitors think that the garden needs weeding and the furniture needs polishing....I am a direct descendant of Joseph Towne, whose two sisters Rebecca Towne Nurse and Mary Towne Easty were hanged in Salem, Massachusetts, in 1692 as witches. I am also a direct descendant of Pocahontas and husband John Rolfe.

Sunday, March 17, 2013

A walk around the house, part one.

Welcome to my Alabama home, built seven generations ago by Benjamin and Hannah Wilson when they came to this county in 1816.  It was used as a house until 1906, then used as a barn until 1992 when I cleaned it out, put in a floor,windows, doors, heating, cooling, and everything else, and moved in. 
 It's a fine spring day and perfect to get a few pictures to inspire me to get out of the house and make some improvements around this place.  Here is a view from my porch across the field to the "old house" built in 1958.  My house is the "new house" built in 1817...perfectly logical in Alabama as I moved from the old house to my "new" one in 1992...hey, it was new to me. 
 These are my fancy steps to the spinning house. The mill stone came from Chilton County.  The marble was a found piece. 
 The spinning house has gotten a bit messy during the winter so a clean up/ clean out is in the plans. The loom in front is ready to load.
 But first I need to hang a door. 
 My father planted this pear tree and it has survived.  A very noisy bird was perched in it.
 On closer inspection it was a red bird who paid me no attention. 
 I bought some red bud trees at our local arbor day many years ago. They now bloom every spring despite Alabama's March weather. 
The nandina bush descends from one of my grandmother's. The birds spread these seeds everywhere.  Our local judge commented to me, " We've had so many weddings this spring that you can't find a nandina berry  or a camelia bloom anywhere in the town." 
 This is my friend Joe's tulip tree, my main marker for spring.  He planted it before he left the state to return to Denver over ten years ago. 
 My grandmother's oxalis is growing and spreading like weeds. I need to send some bulbs to all the cousins.  
 This is a very strong mint from my great uncle, given to me as a start in the 70's.   It's the type used for mint juleps. 
 I think the smell of iris brings back memories of my grandmother more than any other flower. 
The duck weed has once again magically reappeared.  I got a cup full on the side of the road in Louisiana in 1995.   This is growing in a ground container in the back yard, but I can fill a bucket with water in the front yard and a week later it will have made its way there.  

3 comments:

  1. Thanks for the tour. Love the spinning house. I think red buds are my favorite and I have only one that has been cut so many times by mowers! I know you love the NEW house.

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  2. that looks like good country living to me

    I am so ready to walk my yard and get ready for spring planting in my flower beds

    yes get that door hung

    Janice

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  3. Thanks for sharing these photos and tidbits about your place. It looks so beautiful where you are!
    Mary
    http://anhistoricallady.blogspot.com

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